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Vets recommend that all cats, both indoor and outdoor, should have the routine vaccinations against the following diseases depending on your individual circumstances.
EXCERPT from Cat Protection League website
What vaccines does my cat need?
Cats Protection, as a member of The Cat Group, recommends vaccines for the following feline diseases:
Feline infectious enteritis (FIE) – a vaccination must
Feline infectious enteritis (a severe and often fatal gut infection) is caused by the feline parvovirus (or feline panleukopenia virus). Vaccination against FIE has been very successful. Unvaccinated cats are at great risk because the virus is widespread in the environment.
Cat ‘flu – a vaccination must
Two types of cat ‘flu are vaccinated against feline herpesvirus (FHV-1) and feline calicivirus (FCV). These viruses are very common and vaccination will protect your cat against prolonged illness, but because there are many different strains of cat ‘flu the vaccine will not totally eradicate the threat.
EXCERPT from International Cat Care
Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) – a vaccination must for outdoor cats
FeLV is a lifelong infection and unfortunately most cats will die within three years of diagnosis, usually from a subsequent disease like leukaemia, lymphoma (tumours) or progressive anaemia. It is not an airborne disease and can only be passed on via direct contact between cats (usually by saliva or bites). Because of the serious nature of the disease, CP recommends FeLV vaccination.
Feline chlamydophilosis – depends on your circumstances
This bacterium, which causes conjunctivitis in cats, can’t survive in the atmosphere and is thus spread by direct contact between cats (affecting multi-cat households and kittens predominantly). Your vet will discuss your situation and advise as to whether this vaccine is necessary.
Vaccination and protection from disease of cats in a cattery is very important. Anywhere where numbers of cats are kept closely together gives potential for diseases to spread. The cat viruses are very adept at this
For all cats, including those entering a cattery, it is essential that they have received vaccines for the ‘core’ infectious agents — these are:

Vaccines are available against other infectious diseases including Bordetella bronchiseptica, Chlamydophila felis and feline leukaemia virus. However, vaccination against these agents in the well-constructed and well-run cattery situation is not required, as construction and routine hygiene precautions should be adequate to prevent exposure of cats to these agents in this environment.
CATTERY SITUATION
As boarding a cat in a cattery represents a relatively high risk and therefore a special condition, it is prudent to seek a booster vaccine within the previous 12 months for FHV and FCV in this circumstance, and maximum protection may be afforded by giving a booster vaccine in the one to two months prior to entry into a boarding cattery.
If a cat has had a primary vaccination course (minimum of two injections) followed by a first booster within 12 months, it only needs a single booster injection (irrespective of the length of time since the last injection) 2 weeks before it goes into the cattery.
NB: Some vets do insist on restarting the primary two dose schedule if the vaccinations have lapsed for over a year. It is difficult to determine how necessary this is over a single booster, so customers are advised to follow their own vet’s advice.
A veterinary vaccination record where the cat is clearly identified (preferably by microchip) should be used to ensure relevant (FPV, FHV and FCV) vaccinations have been administered.

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